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Thread: 825i Clutch Kit Install 50 MPH!!

  1. #11
    Senior Member MBDiagMan's Avatar
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    Yes, I am sensitive to an over revving engine myself. That said, these are short stroke, small displacement engines. Since there are three cylinders, each piston and rod represents a VERY small amount of reciprocating weight. I can't imagine that high revs will hurt them. In fact, many motorcycle engines with such small piston and rods, turn close to double this RPM with no problem.

    IMHO, the design appears solid as it is. You just need to get beyond the idea that it is over revving itself. Once you convince your instincts that it is not damaging itself, I don't think it will bother you nearly so much.

    Doc

  2. #12
    Senior Member ratrod's Avatar
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    Has anyone figured out or knows who JD buys these clutches from? It appears to be nothing more than a snowmobile clutch, and if you knew what make and model sleds these clutches were used on you could buy weights and springs for a lot cheaper than 300 bucks at a dealer. You could also change the spring in the secondary clutch. I'd guess the spring thats in the clutch is pretty stiff thats why you need the higher rpm's to get things moving. If you got a softer spring it would engage the clutch sooner.

  3. #13
    Member IdleUp's Avatar
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    Bottom line is I bought the 825i for the very fact it has a "Big" 3 cyl engine with plenty of torque & HP and there is no reason for it to be screaming at 4200+ rpm when you're going down the road at 10 mph. Facts are facts, the clutch and gearing system is obsolete which is proven by the fact they are still using a free-wheeling clutch design I had on my Mule's over 15 years ago.
    JD needs to send some money on a transmission like Kubota had to when they introduced their version of the Gator.

  4. #14
    Senior Member DIXIEDOG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleUp View Post
    Bottom line is I bought the 825i for the very fact it has a "Big" 3 cyl engine with plenty of torque & HP and there is no reason for it to be screaming at 4200+ rpm when you're going down the road at 10 mph. Facts are facts, the clutch and gearing system is obsolete which is proven by the fact they are still using a free-wheeling clutch design I had on my Mule's over 15 years ago.
    They are keeping the engine at an rpm that keeps it in it's powerband. DOHC engines like to turn, it's just how they are.

    Quote Originally Posted by IdleUp View Post
    JD needs to send some money on a transmission like Kubota had to when they introduced their version of the Gator.

    Then everyone would be complaining about the abrupt halt that sends them into the steering wheel every time they let off the go pedal or they would complain that when they mash the throttle the engine bogs rather than accelerates. I like the smoothness of the take off from the Kubota I traded in but I prefer the instant acceleration and climbing ability of the Gator better.

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    Senior Member Dane's Avatar
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    It sounds like time to quit complaining, take the 825 apart, and get the rear clutch in hand. At the very least you could then measure the spring to order a replacement of a different strength. I don't think that a lighter spring alone will do what you want but it might be part of the solution. First I would remove the bed and clutch cover and have someone drive the vehicle while you are free to observe the clutches and belt to see what's happening and when.

    I did the reverse of what's being discussed with my gas golf cart. It had poor low end torque. Wasn't great climbing hills with a heavy load and the clutch would let go when you got off the gas so you had no engine braking. Hopefully this will give some clues, but I'm not sure how well doing the opposite will help lower your rpm's and still maintain driveability.

    1. Machined a bit off the face near the shaft to allow the two plates to get a bit closer together. They were always able to touch but before when they were touching the top width was still too wide to allow the belt to climb all the way to the top.

    2. I swapped the spring for a heavier one. As you'd expect it forces the plates together harder, keeping the belt higher on the pulley for longer and in low gear.

    3. I switched to a slightly shorter belt. The old belt, when the cart was stopped or when off the throttle, had a good deal of slack. The smaller belt keeps the drivetrain coupled to the engine at all times. At first you'd think you'r head would snap every time you got off the gas but the opposite turned out to be true. With the engine always engaged except when totally stopped there was not the "wait for it" moment when the engine would engage, especially when getting back on the throttle when going downhill. It also made decelerating very smooth and predictable.

    Most surprising was my top speed. All the changes I made should have slowed my top end but it actually increased. I think mostly due to the shorter belt which allows it to get lower on the rear clutch. When driving, even with the modifications to keep it in low gear, it's amazing how quickly (and at slow speed) the belt drops to the lowest position (high gear) on the rear clutch.

  6. #16
    Member K-DOG's Avatar
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    Team Industries makes both the primary and secondary.

    Quote Originally Posted by ratrod View Post
    Has anyone figured out or knows who JD buys these clutches from? It appears to be nothing more than a snowmobile clutch, and if you knew what make and model sleds these clutches were used on you could buy weights and springs for a lot cheaper than 300 bucks at a dealer. You could also change the spring in the secondary clutch. I'd guess the spring thats in the clutch is pretty stiff thats why you need the higher rpm's to get things moving. If you got a softer spring it would engage the clutch sooner.

  7. #17
    Senior Member MBDiagMan's Avatar
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    Well it sounds as if K-DOG is giving a really good piece of information for those of you who want to modify your machine.

    I have LOTS of experience building, rebuilding and modifying all sorts of engines and feel that I have much more than the average persons amount of motor savvy. Although the advertised torque curve as seen in the brochure is amazingly flat, if you are wanting acceleration, acceleration is a function of horsepower. Horsepower is a calculated value that increases with RPM. The same torque at 2,000 RPM will not result in the same accleration as that torque at 5,000 RPM.

    For those of you who are not so concerned about strong acceleration and prefer more slow speed economy, then it sounds like modifying the clutch and/or belt drive may end up with the result you're looking for. Such a modification, however, MIGHT result in lugging of the engine and decrease bottom end life, but that's nothing but speculation.

    Doc

  8. #18
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    Has anyone installed this kit? I'd like to know how it achieves 50mph. There is a limiter in the engine controller that cuts the motor out, like a rev limiter, but it is related to vehicle speed not engine rpm. At 45 mph, the motor will cut out regardless of the rpm the engine is turning. I installed a lighter spring in my clutch which dropped the shift out rpms but it still cuts out at 45mph. And for what it's worth I tried to get some info from tech support at TEAM and they blew me off. So I poked around and found the spring rate charts and ordered a TEAM spring from one of their dealers. For $22 I think I achieved the same thing they do for $200. Maybe that's why they blew me off. ??

  9. #19
    Senior Member DIXIEDOG's Avatar
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    I wonder if the instrument cluster was unplugged if it would get rid of the speed limiter? Mine does the same cut out at 45....then 44....then back to 45.....then cuts down to 44...........it continues on while my buddies Rzr slowly pulls away at 50 ish.

  10. #20
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    I have been reading all he post related to the 825i for the last year. This my first post I have 2012 825i I put 28x10 14 tires front and back gates belt and team clutch. My speedo is off by 4 miles an hour now have to use Gps to track my speed. Speedo stops at 48 @ 5900 rpm Gps says 52MPH.

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